Our Members

A diverse group of people have joined the ecovillage. People from all walks of life, from all over the country and abroad, young and old, families and single people, are working together to create an enriching place to live.

People join the ecovillage for a variety of reasons. Many are attracted to the community aspect, others to green living and food production, others to the democratic and inclusive nature of the community.

Below, a few residents explain why they joined up to the ecovillage:

Gemma Brugha

Nurse, and runs a project in Malawi

Gemma Brugha

I really came for the reason of living a sustainable life, I didn’t think of the community aspect at all but in fact that part is a bonus to me.

I really like life here, because you can have everything. I always like the countryside and it’s lovely and peaceful but there’s plenty to do. I might go up to Dublin on the train to stay for a few days to see my friends. But I’m always glad to be back here where you know everybody. You don’t have to be friends with them but you know them.

John Burke

Former taxi driver

John Burke

One day I was riding around in my taxi and I heard Gavin Harte, one of the project’s founders, on the radio and he was talking about what I had been thinking about for quite for a long time so I signed up immediately. That was in 1999, and I eventually moved down here in 2010.

Very simply I’d be dead if I lived anywhere else. Life here is great. Everybody knows everybody. There are no nasty people and nobody is nosey, we don’t poke our noses into anyone else’s business. If you need help with anything all you do is send an e-mail to members and you can be sure you’ll get it. It happened to a woman when her car broke down, all she had to do was make a call. She had about 40 people she could call from the village who would come out a give her a lift.

Davie Philip

Educator and facilitator

Davie Philip

I felt that we needed a model in Ireland, a place where you could come and visit, and where you could see renewable energy, organic agriculture, and green buildings to inspire people to make changes in their own lifestyles and in their own communities.

It’s rare enough now to actually know your neighbour and I think any actions we’re going to make towards reducing carbon emissions or towards sustainability requires building those social connections and the ability to do more together. That is what I really love about the Ecovillage. We know each other, we trust each other, and we can do more together than most people in this country. That’s something we are relearning and here’s a great place to experience that in action.

Ena Holland

Retired teacher

Ena Holland

It all happened together, my retirement and my moving to the ecovillage. So it was community that attracted me mostly.

Life in the eco village is very pleasant, and the members are very friendly and orderly with each other on the whole. We have our issues, it’s not nirvana, but how we solve and address them is very satisfactory. It’s all community based. I like the involvement we all have with decision making. We’re not all being dictated to, we all have a say.

Jenny Fahy

Five-rhythms movement teacher and social care practitioner

Jenny Fahy

I was drawn to live here because I wanted to build a warm eco-home with my family, yet I was interested in being part of rural life and living in an ecological neighbourhood within an existing village.

It’s definitely interesting and stimulating. It’s a good place to live where one can play a meaningful role in the community. What I like about living here is that it is an eco neighbourhood within a rural community. I wouldn’t be interested in living in just an ecovillage. It’s a good place to live and you definitely get to be an active participant in decision making and you get to create your environment where you live.

Bruce Darrell

Educated as an architect but operating as a grower, researcher, writer, systems designer and builder

Bruce Darrel

I was attracted to the idea of doing some real work on environmental sustainability and creating a radically different way of living within the context of Ireland. I wanted to prove it could be done and to show that to other people, and to help them do it themselves, and to show that we can have a good life while doing it.

Life in the Ecovillage is interesting and has both positive and negative aspects. It is both fast paced and slow paced. I’m more active here than I would have been anywhere else and I do a wide variety of different things. The opportunities for learning, exploring, and developing at an interpersonal level, a personal level, and at a skills level are enormous, higher than you could probably get anywhere else, especially as an adult.

Pa Finucane

Manager of the ecohostel

Pa Finucane

I was looking for a business to start somewhere and I came across the website. I then visited the EcoVillage and was very taken with the project. So I suggested that I would build a hostel here for the community especially because we are an educational charity.

I find life here just fine. It’s a nice laid back pace of life. I’m at retiring age, luckily enough I have health and I am able to run a hostel here. The hostel itself is easy to run because we do it right. But what I didn’t realise before coming down here is the sense of community. The community here is really strong and that is a really important aspect of what we’re doing here.

Martin Maguire

Actor and writer

Martin Maguire

It was the idea of people trying to work in harmony with the earth rather than exploit it that attracted me.

I find it fantastic. I sometimes think of it as the Garden of Eden. We have a lot of people working very hard to try to find better ways of doing things and we’ve had to work hard together to achieve what we have achieved so we’ve gotten to know each other very well so there’s a strong sense of community. There is a really welcoming local population and it’s fascinating to see the ways in which our lives complement each other’s and work together. So it’s a very good place to be.

John Jopling

Retired lawyer

John Jopling

I came here because it is being developed by a group of people, as opposed to a developer.

I find it fantastic. The alternative would be a housing estate and this is just ten times more friendly and interesting. What’s key to it is doing so much for ourselves, growing as much of our own food as possible, heating our own water. We’re trying to learn to do as much as possible so I suppose why I like it here, is that I can be part of a group that is learning to be more self-sufficient.